Want to know why we should take this seriously?

"Don't be complacent." Michael Taylor with fiance Mariya, daughter, Milena, 6, and Sammy the "hairy, black, white, brown bitsa, 7.

"Don't be complacent." Michael Taylor with fiance Mariya, daughter, Milena, 6, and Sammy the "hairy, black, white, brown bitsa, 7.

A grim warning has come from a former Goondiwindi man whose family is at the epicentre of the human tragedy that is Italy's coronavirus pandemic.

Journalist, 51 year-old Michael Taylor now calls Cernobbio in Northern Italy home. One of the world's great holiday destinations has become a place of death and deep sadness. Almost 6000 people have died from coronavirus more than a few, left to die alone. And the message for Goondiwindi residents from Michael is, don't think "she'll be right".

"Questions have to be asked," he said to residents in Facebook Post last week.

"How many isolation ICU beds does Gundy hospital have? How many masks, respirators, respirator valves, gloves, soaps and gels do they have? "When the wave hits you, nobody will be able to rely on beds in Toowoomba or Brisbane. They'll be overcapacity and you'll be on your own.

"In Bergamo and Brescia, the doctors and nurses have PTSD symptoms from performing triage, deciding who has more potential years of life and leaving the others in a closed off area to fend for themselves and almost certainly die. Both cities have called in convoys of army trucks to take the bodies away because their crematoriums can't burn the coffins fast enough to keep pace. Medical staff now account for 8.5% of new cases, so they're literally killing themselves or watching their colleagues die to save people. And all they want people to do is stay at home and don't touch anything or anyone."

They have masks ordered but suppliers are finding other countries that are willing to pay more.

"It's also a death that happens in isolation. People here can be whisked away in an ambulance and taken to whichever hospital in a 100km radius has the least worst overflow. It hardly matters that people don't know where their loved ones have been taken for days because they can't see them anyway. The people dying have no opportunity to say goodbye, to pass on their thoughts, to say those things they might have said, because they die alone, with only sporadic visits from doctors, nurses and cleaning staff.

In this kind of pandemic there's no such thing as too careful, too early or too paranoid

Michael Taylor

"Bush folk have a great opportunity to ride this out because they're used to isolation and shopping for a week at a time. It's time they taught the townies the same discipline. In this kind of pandemic there's no such thing as too careful, too early or too paranoid."