Take our poll and tell us whether you feel the new PVC fence should be replaced with a timber one

What do you think of the Customs' House fence? It may have to be replaced after a complaint.
What do you think of the Customs' House fence? It may have to be replaced after a complaint.

Who’s the dibber-dobber?

Council isn’t laughing after a complaint was made to the Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage about a fence fronting the Customs House.

And nor should ratepayers, according to the Goondiwindi Historical Society which manages the Customs House and which asked Council for the fence.

“It’s just nonsense,” says President Di Cairns.

The fence, which cost $17,000, may have to be replaced by a timber fence costing a further (estimated) $35,000.

But Council won’t pull the PVC picket fence without a fight.

Councillors said at the GRC Council meeting on Wednesday they were prepared to go to the minister about the decision.

“It just doesn’t pass the pub test,” GRC Mayor, Cr Graeme Scheu said.

“I reckon if you asked 11,000 residents only a handful, if that, would challenge it (having the fence as it is).

“It’s just bureacracy gone mad.”

Cr Joan White called it “ridiculous”, Cr Rick McDougall said 99percent wouldn’t even realise it wasn’t made out of timber while Cr Lachie Brennan said it was a “crock”.

It is the same type of fencing used  for the cricket oval and Riddles Ovals.

What’s your view? 

According to the Council website, a border customs point before Federation, the Customs House and its magnificent cottage garden, house a rich and colourful collection of mementos of yesteryear.

Around 1850, the Customs House was built on the northern bank of the Macintyre River, a modest three-room cottage with detached kitchen, a fire precaution of the day.

Its shingled roof covered sturdy walls of pitsawn timber, morticed top and bottom into slots, a building technique which declined towards the end of the 19th century.

In its day the Customs House was used to collect the tax paid on goods crossing between Queensland and New South Wales.

The Museum has well kept gardens and an impressive variety of books, journals and memorabilla from yesteryear.

Open times: Monday, Tuesday, Friday & Saturday  9am – 1pm

This is what the Customs House looked like before various councils and the Goondiwindi community got to work.

This is what the Customs House looked like before various councils and the Goondiwindi community got to work.

Pictured at left, Historical Society President, Di Cairns.

Pictured at left, Historical Society President, Di Cairns.