Essential Energy crews on standby after summer storms strike the region

All that is left of a 24m x 12m steel frame shed and workshop following the wild storm which lashed Inglewood last week.
All that is left of a 24m x 12m steel frame shed and workshop following the wild storm which lashed Inglewood last week.

A fierce storm with lightning, strong driving winds and drenching rain lashed Inglewood for almost two hours late Wednesday evening last week. Power was lost for several hours during the night and into the next morning.

The dog kennel which sheltered “Chloe” and escaped destruction during Inglewood’s wild storm.

The dog kennel which sheltered “Chloe” and escaped destruction during Inglewood’s wild storm.

“At daybreak evidence of the power of the wind could be seen with house yards and streets littered with large and small tree branches,” Inglewood resident and regular Argus contributor, Mavis “Poss” Stower said.“Several large trees in the town and surrounding areas  were either blown over or uprooted and a large 24m x 12m steel framed shed on the town’s industrial estate was completely demolished.

“The roof of the workshop owned by local Earthmoving Contractor Chris Harrow was blown onto a neighbour’s property. One very lucky dog was “Chloe”, a nine year-old border collie and a much loved pet. A large tree next to her kennel was split in two by the wind and fell over. One section missed her kennel by a whisker while the other fell into the back lane blocking off vehicular traffic.  

“At first Chloe was nowhere to be seen but was found huddled as far back as she could go inside her kennel which had fortunately escaped destruction. The ferocity of the storm was reminiscent of a mini-cyclone which cut a swathe through the eastern side of Inglewood in the early 1950s unroofing what was then the original, wooden, double story Masonic Hall building. “

At first Chloe was nowhere to be seen but was found huddled

Mavis "Poss" Stower

It’s due to storms such as this one which has Essential Energy across the region on standby.Regional Manager Northern, Mark Summers, said when storms, lightning, heavy rain and wind gusts damage Essential Energy’s network, crews are ready to respond.

“Essential Energy monitors the network continuously and has crews ready to be dispatched in the event of an unplanned power outage,” Mark said.“While our crews are ready to respond 24/7, we’re asking our customers to also be prepared for storms, stay safe and be patient while we work to restore power after these severe weather events.”

Essential Energy reminds people to report damaged infrastructure and keep at least eight metres away. “Always treat power lines as live and remember that anything in contact with them, such as cars, trees or fences, can conduct electricity and pose a danger,” Mark said. If you notice fallen trees, deceased animals, smoke, fire, or scorched areas around electrical equipment, call  13 20 80