Goondiwindi Days for Girls provide essential hygiene kits to females across the world | video

Goondiwindi Days for Girls volunteers Gail Rixon, Fay Vanderstok, Gloria Cory and Lea Eglington.
Goondiwindi Days for Girls volunteers Gail Rixon, Fay Vanderstok, Gloria Cory and Lea Eglington.

A group of ladies in Goondiwindi have changed the lives of more than 500 females across the world.

By handcrafting feminine hygiene kits, these local volunteers have assisted women in underprivileged countries to go to school and work whilst menstruating.

As part of a Goondiwindi Rotary Project, ‘Days for Girls’ is a world-wide initiative to craft washable feminine hygiene kits.

Kits from Gundy have been sent to women in Nepal, Kenya, Cambodia and a Syrian refugee camp in Greece.

Local volunteer Lea Eglington said there was a lot involved in the making of the kits. 

“Each washable kit includes two shields which have a waterproof lining in them, eight removable liners, two pairs of underwear, a washcloth, soap and two zip lock bags which can be used to hold water for washing if they have a lack of water.”

A beautiful cotton bag holds the complete kit which can be doubled as a school bag for the younger ladies.

If females don’t have the kits, they miss up to 60 days of school and work per year.

“Sixty days is a lot of education and work missed,” she said.

Whilst the grassroots, not for profit organisation first began in America, it soon spread across the world and any crafting group is invited to jump on board and help create the kits.

The Days for Girls vision is to supply every woman and girl in the world with ready and feasible access to quality hygiene products and health education by 2022.

The kits are estimated to last for three years.